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Eurofound study shows patchy response to burnout among Member States

Eurofound’s new publication Burnout in the workplace: A review of data and policy responses in the EU, shows European countries have a varied approach to burnout, in terms of definition and placing it into particular policy areas. The study shows European countries place burnout under a range of policy fields such as general health, mental health, occupational health.

burnout-2161445_960_720 Sept 14 2018

While welcoming this new report, Eurocadres believes that this scattered approach to burnout – and in a broader context psychosocial risks – further confirms the need for a new EU Directive which deals with psychosocial risks, at an EU-wide level.

Martin Jefflén Eurocadres President believes; ‘This new study provides further evidence, that the EU member states do not have a systematic approach to psychosocial risks and to burnout, hence the need for a directive which is consistent and legally binding throughout the EU’.

Eurofound asked its Network of Correspondents in the 28 EU Member States of the European Union and Norway to identify the most relevant national research and policy debates on burnout – what is its incidence? Is it a disease or a syndrome? What are its work-related determinants, while also comparing how the issue has been addressed by the social partners and in public policy in each country

The report summaries how Member States respond to burnout, through different policy areas such as mental health, workplace stress and working time. However, numerous European countries have no actual policy response, when it comes to dealing with burnout. According to Jefflén, ‘there is clearly a need for additional research, which focuses on work-related determinants. Stress and professional burnout are reaching epidemic levels in Europe. Workers representatives and trade unions need to be better informed not only about burnout, but about psychosocial risks and the prevention measures needed to tackle them’.

Stress and professional burnout are reaching epidemic levels in Europe. Workers representatives and trade unions need to be better informed not only about burnout, but about psychosocial risks and the prevention measures needed to tackle them’.

To this end, Eurocadres is currently running a series of training seminars on; Psychosocial health risks: Professionals and Managers in the front line. The next seminar will take place in Paris on the 20th and 21st of September. The seminar will address recognizing key health risk factors in manager’s and professional’s occupational life, in terms of psychosocial risks.  The seminar will train workers’ representatives and trade unions officers on how to recognize these risks and give them options regarding tackling risks once they have been recognized.