Our Blog

Employability and trade unions

By Michael Tottrup | February 18, 2016

New technologies and an ever faster changing labour market requires of employees to adapt their skills and competences to stay employable. Trade unions have huge potential to accompany their members in this process.

Mental health situation calls for action

By Martin Jefflen | February 1, 2016

The social partners need to take on the issue of mental health at work. Mental disorders are very common in Europe and are a major burden on society. There is also a need to clarify in legislation that occupational health and safety at work is not only about the physical workplace.

Eva Nordmark, President of TCO, Sweden

Trade union change for recruiting professionals & managers

By Eva Nordmark | January 22, 2016

Everything a trade union does or says has an organising perspective. We communicate key political messages and we talk about image and, not least, how to become attractive and relevant for potential members. In Europe there are millions of them out there.

Paula Ruiz Rorres

Countries exporting highly qualified & skilled workers paying a price in the short term

By Paula Ruiz Torres | January 15, 2016

The financial crisis and the lack of jobs have caused brain drain, increasing migration of highly educated and skilled workers from the South and East to seek work in the North and West of Europe.

From stress to engagement

By Dirk Antonissen | January 4, 2016

Many efforts are put in sensitising employers and employees to adhere the necessary attention to psychosocial risks.

Social market structures can encourage cross-border labour mobility

By Sirpa Pietikäinen | December 11, 2015

Europe is recovering from the economic crisis that has left its mark on many peoples’ lives. Nearly one quarter of EU citizens (24.6 %) are currently regarded as being at risk of poverty or social exclusion.

“Welfare tourism” – perceptions and the reality

By Klára Fóti | December 2, 2015

Freedom of movement of persons is undoubtedly one of the most important values of the EU. Moreover, labour mobility in particular can contribute to better match labour supply with demand, helping to raise employment levels.

Majority of women fear taking a career break

By Pav Akhtar | November 12, 2015

A recent survey from the London Business School has revealed that 70 per cent of women feel anxious about taking a career break for maternity leave or travel and the impact it will have on their careers.

Climate Change is Union Business

By Hanna Sjölund | November 5, 2015

With less than a month until world leaders will meet in Paris for the UN climate conference, COP21, the temperature is rising with the warmest 1 November in Brussels since measurements began.

Participation of P&MS workers in the social dialogue will fine-tune the mobility practices

By Jan De Paepe | November 3, 2015

Sometimes the enthusiasm to work abroad is tempered by practical inconveniences and uncertainties causing feelings of suspicion and doubts. Considerations and questions arise like… will my partner be happy there?

Digitalisation changes professions

By Jean-Luc Molins | September 4, 2019

Digital and organisational solutions go hand in hand. The role of workers in new work environments is changing.

50 years of struggle

By Martin Jefflen | June 28, 2019

50 years ago today, in the early morning of June 28th, police raided the Stonewall inn in Greenwich village, New York. This day the LGBT community fought back.

Pursuing a just transition and fairer digitalisation

By Paula Ruiz Torres | June 5, 2019

The transition to a resilient, low-carbon economy holds out immense potential for economic, environmental and social development, as well as job creation, however, these benefits will not happen automatically, there could be significant transitional costs and implications .

Building democracy and a better future for Europe’s working people

By Elizabeth Barreiros | May 29, 2019

Workers are Europe’s most important capital. But the last economic crisis has left deep scars, such as job insecurity, more precariousness, poor working conditions, increased deregulation of labour relations, lower wages and a rise in occupational diseases.

Room for improving labour mobility

By Nayla Glaise | May 28, 2019

Although labour mobility is one of the founding principles of the European Union (EU), there is still much room for improvement, particularly for young people. Eurostat estimates that half of unemployed young people in the EU are willing to settle elsewhere to get a job, according to Nayla Glaise, speaking at the ETUC Congress

EU’s just transition demands life-long learning

By Martin Jefflen | January 24, 2019

Life-ling learning is a necessity, if workers are to remain competitive in today’s high-skilled job markets. A just transition will require the development of reskilling and upskilling programmes.

Brexit and its impact on higher education

By Thomas Jorgensen | December 13, 2018

Brexit came as a shock to the higher education world; the prospect of UK universities falling out of the European mechanisms for cooperation was both unexpected and alarming.

Martin Jefflen

Why Europe should back a robust whistleblowers directive

By Martin Jefflen | November 22, 2018

Those who report corruption, criminal acts and breaches of public trust must be protected, writes Martin Jefflén, who calls for lowering the barriers when it comes to reporting wrongdoing in the corporate sphere.

Martin Todd

The crudest forms of racism are alive and kicking within the workplace

By Martin Todd | September 18, 2018

One of the myths regarding racism is that black professionals and managers do not face the crude forms of racial insults and attacks, within the workplace. However, at the recent ETUC/ETUI workshop on racism and xenophobia in the workplace, fundamentally challenged any such perception.

Professional women have to become the big fish

By Janina Mackiewicz | July 31, 2018

For some time now, it has been noted that European women are highly-skilled, and an increasing number of women graduate with tertiary education. Still, highly-educated women find it harder to enter the labour market and are in lower-skilled jobs in comparison to men.